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Reblogged from myquidditchlife  11 notes

myquidditchlife:

While re-watching “Brooms Up!” yesterday, I made an observation that I had never noticed before.  Shortly after the 24 minute mark in the video, Pitt loses by 10 points to Tufts on the Snitch grab, in the semifinal game that determined who would face Middlebury in the championship game.  I had never noticed this before, but look at the expressions on the faces of the Pitt players.  They are devastated, and it looks like they just had their hearts broken. 

This is gonna sound a little weird, but it was good to see the Pitt players react like that.  It means they put everything they had into that game, and the feeling of just barely coming up short despite their best efforts was painful.  Those are the looks of players who gave their best to reach their goal of getting to the championship game, and came up a measly 10 points short.  They were ahead, had nearly pulled out of snitch range, and were beaten by the narrowest of margins.  That hurts.  A lot.  And it should. 

I think the reason I had never noticed it in the video before was because I had mainly watched it while I was brand new to the sport.  I didn’t know what defeat by the narrowest of margins felt like.  I didn’t know what it was like to see your best effort come up barely short.

The looks of complete devastation on the Pitt players’ faces are a good thing.  That agony of defeat is a feeling that you should harness, and use it as motivation.  When you are trying to get in better physical condition for quidditch and your muscles are aching and you want to quit and take the easy way out, remember that feeling of agony.  Let it motivate you to push yourself.  When you start to get frustrated with your shortcomings as a quidditch player, remember that agony and let it drive you to train and work harder to improve. 

The agony of defeat, especially close defeat, is painful, but it can also be a huge positive.  Let it push you to become the best you can be, so you don’t have to feel that agony again. 

Reblogged from mudbloodsthemovie  60 notes
theroadtoworld:

IQA Rule 7.1.3.
Designed by Calvin Ng of the SFU Marauders

With the arrival of Rulebook 8, it’s now called Title 9 3/4, but the idea remains the same: gender equality, no matter how you identify. I’ve never really seen any kind of exclusion based on gender in Quidditch, but just in case there ever was any, the IQA has your back.

theroadtoworld:

IQA Rule 7.1.3.

Designed by Calvin Ng of the SFU Marauders

With the arrival of Rulebook 8, it’s now called Title 9 3/4, but the idea remains the same: gender equality, no matter how you identify. I’ve never really seen any kind of exclusion based on gender in Quidditch, but just in case there ever was any, the IQA has your back.

Reblogged from brandeisquidditch  16 notes

Quidditch and Community Outreach: “Kidditch”

brandeisquidditch:

Quidditch is too awesome a sport to be kept within a single community; it is meant to be shared. Most (not all, but most) quidditch players are born only after setting foot on a college campus. Because of the abundance of community teams sprouting up all over the country, quidditch can be played well into one’s adult years. Yet, there’s a whole demographic that is missing out on this sport: children and adolescents.

That’s pretty tragic, considering how fun quidditch is.

We, the first generation of quidkids, have a duty to the next generation. Not necessarily to train them into quidditch prodigies, but to simply introduce them to the sport. Kids have the opportunity to become involved with soccer, softball, gymnastics, football, and every other sport almost as soon as they can walk. With enough exposure, maybe one day quidditch will be added to that list: a totally legitimate athletic outlet for school-aged kids.

We’re not quite there yet, but here are some tips for bringing Kidditch to your community!

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Congratulations to Team US on their success in the Global Games yesterday! These cool kids competed to take the gold against the UK, Mexico, Australia, Belgium, Canada, and France. We’re so proud of all of our friends on this year’s team, and congratulate everybody who participated in this year’s Global Games!

Reblogged from quidgif  3 notes
Where do these quidditch games take place? :D

quidgif:

My GIFs are from games around Southern Ontario, Canada (Toronto, Ottawa, Hamilton), but Muggle Quidditch is played internationally.

If you are looking to play I suggest:

1) Google your city/country with “quidditch” or “muggle quidditch” to see if there are any teams around you

2)Check at a local University/College/Community centre/convention to see if there are teams

3)If you can’t find any teams start your own! There are a lot of people and resources online who can advise and encourage you if you start a team, and it is a lot of fun

http://iqaquidditch.com/ might have some information to help you (including rules to the game)

Anyone else have helpful links (like maps)?

Feel free to message us with your location and we can hook you up with teams and events in your area :)
Or even just peruse our tumblr